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The best car heads-up display for 2022

One of the biggest problems with cars is their heads-up display. To see important information, you would normally have to look away from the road for at least a second. A heads-up display puts all of the information right in front of your eyes. A HUD can provide a wealth information that you might not otherwise be able see.

It is surprisingly useful and has led to a growing number cars offering an HUD built into their vehicles. There are many heads-up displays that you can add to cars that do not have one. These displays will keep you informed without making it difficult to drive. These are the top car heads-up displays that you can purchase right now

Which are the most effective car heads-up displays

The Hudway Drive is our favorite car head-up display. Although the $279 price tag may seem high, it offers almost all you need from a heads up display. The OBD port, GPS satellites, and your smartphone combine data to give you every bit of information at a glance, including turn-by-turn navigation. It can sometimes get in the way.

The Pyle PHUD180BD is a great option for those who don’t want to pay that much. It costs only $67. The 5.5-inch screen is super bright and can display up to 14 datapoints from your car’s OBD port. It also features alarms for when things go wrong. The Wiiyii C1 is another option that combines OBD/GPS data. It is a very affordable $60 HUD that offers both a beautiful design and useful information.

The Dagood A8, which comes with a $53 price, is worth looking into if you are able to handle the faux leather case. The Dagood A8 has bright graphics and a light sensor to adjust the 5.5-inch display automatically. It also manages to pack a lot of information right in front of your eyes.

Dagood’s HUD does not have GPS support. However, the Akabane A500 ($90) offers OBD data and GPS support. It’s bulky and cumbersome, but it offers a lot of information on a direct-view screen that can withstand the sun. There’s also the AutoolX95 GPS Slope Meter. This would be ideal for off-roaders thanks to its sensors that measure speed and incline, as well as roll angles. It is GPS-centric, but does not have OBD data connectivity. However, it only costs $65.

The best heads up displays

1. Hudway Drive

Specifications

Dimensions: 7.3×6.3×4.0 inches

Weight: 9.0 oz

12-volt accessory outlet

Display size: 1.8 inches

Color/Monochrome: Color

Displayed parameters: 11

Alarms

There are many reasons to buy

+Includes self-contained projection screens+Integrates OBD/phone data+Easy for you to read

Avoidable reasons

-Big-Expensive

The Hudway drive has everything you need in a car head-up display. It can combine data from your smartphone, the OBD port and satellites. It doesn’t allow you to add Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, but that may be a bit too much.

It is the most expensive HUD on the market at $279. It’s worth the cost because of all the information it can provide. It can show you driving speed, engine RPMs and turn-by-turn directions. The unit is quite large and can sometimes obscure your view of the road.

2. Pyle PHUD180BD

Specifications

Size: 5.3×3.0x0.5 inches

Weight: 4.4 ounces

Power: OBD2 port

Display size: 5.5 inches

Color/Monochrome: Color

Displayed parameters: 14

Alarms

There are many reasons to buy

+Self-contained screen+Excellent variety of read-outs+Bright display

Avoidable reasons

-Projection screen can get in way -No phone integration

The Pyle PHUD180BD can squeeze a lot of information on its 5.5-inch screen. But even more impressive is the $67 price tag. Although it isn’t the most affordable car head-up display, it is still an excellent bargain. It can even combine OBD and GPS data.

This car head-up display is one of the most impressive you can find. It has a large and bright display, as well as the ability to display more than 20 pieces of information about your vehicle. Although it can be a bit cumbersome at times, it does have phone integration. However, the price is $67.

3. Wiiyii C1 OBD + GPS

Specifications

Size: 4.3×5.0x3.5inches

Weight: 4.4 ounces

12-volt accessory outlet

Display size: 1.8 inches

Color/Monochrome: Color

Displayed parameters: 15

Alarms

There are many reasons to buy

+Self-contained projection screen +Uses OBD data and GPS data+Fold down screen

Avoidable reasons

-Lacks smartphone integration-No navigation

The Wiiyoo C1 car head-up display combines OBD and GPS data. It displays a lot of data in an attractive format. This HUD is for those who need more than what their dashboard can offer. It also supports data that true gear-heads will love. This HUD might be right for you if you want to see air-to fuel ratios and turbocharger pressures while driving.

Unfortunately, there is no integration with your phone and no navigation features. You get a HUD that has a projection screen and can scan for OBD fault codes and alert you. It costs only $56.

4. Dagood A8

 

Specifications

Dimensions: 5.2×3.0-x0.6inches

Weight: 3.4 ounces

Power: OBD2 port

Display size: 5.5 inches

Color/Monochrome: Color

Displayed parameters: 7

Alarms

There are many reasons to buy

+Bright graphics+Inexpensive+Includes light sensor

Avoidable reasons

Can interfere with windshield view – No integrated screen

Although we could have done with the faux leather finish, we think the Dagood A8 car head-up display still holds a lot of promise. It is affordable, has a large display of 5.5 inches, bright graphics and a light sensor that adjusts brightness to the environment. You can also view all the information in your car by combining OBD and GPS data.

Although the Dagood A8 is large, it can sometimes get in the way. This is not due to the absence of an integrated screen. The large display makes it easy to read the information at a glance, which allows you to avoid distractions while driving. It’s an excellent addition to any car’s dashboard, offering a variety of information.

5. Akabane A500

Specifications

Dimensions: 4.3-x-3.3-x 2.9-inches

Weight: 5.1 oz

Power: OBD-II port

Display size: 3.5 inches

Color/Monochrome: Color

Displayed parameters: 60

Alarms

There are many reasons to buy

+OBD, GPS data, Direct view display+Lots more parameters

Avoidable reasons

-Stiff and bulky design that blocks view.

The Akabane A500 is another car head-up display that combines the OBD port and GPS satellites. It can do many things other HUDs cannot. It can display a variety of information, but performance enthusiasts will also be pleased to learn that it can test acceleration and braking. Is your Tesla capable of hitting 0-60 in the time it claims? You can find out with the Akabane A500, but we do not recommend that you test it on public roads.

It can be difficult to navigate the menu settings and the screen at 3.5 inches is not very large. It can still show you a lot of information during a drive, and it has OBD connectivity that allows it to detect faults in your car. Its low price is just a bonus.

6. Autol X95 GPS Slopemeter

Specifications

Dimensions: 3.3×3.2×2.2 inches

Weight: 2.9 ounces

12-volt accessory outlet

Display size: 2.1 inches

Color/Monochrome: Color

Displayed parameters: 6

Alarms No

There are many reasons to buy

+Uses GPS data+Sensors show tilt angle and roll angle +Direct View Display+Accessory adapter has 2 USB power ports

Avoidable reasons

-Lacks OBD data-Tall design obstructs view-Lacks phone integration

The Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter, if you are more into off-roading, is something to consider. It uses a combination GPS and its own sensors to show you a lot of information as well as some specialist data points. If your car gets too close to the point where there is no return, tilt and roll sensors will alert you.

It can’t access OBD data so it doesn’t have a lot of information that other HUDs depend on. This might make it difficult for some to drive on roads. It is still a compact, lightweight design with an easy-to-use interface that would make it a great purchase for certain drivers.

What to look out for in a heads-up car display

Heads-up displays are designed to show the driver the vehicle’s operational parameters and make it easy to read, understand and take in at a glance. A standalone model has the advantage of being able to show more data than many modern HUDs. They can’t be integrated into the car’s entertainment and navigation systems.

However, not all head-up displays for cars are created equal. They come in many sizes and can display a wide range of information. While some HUDs simply repeat the information on the dashboard, others offer additional information such as speed and time.

Many people make a greater leap to demonstrate a variety of items that are not normally considered important to safe driving but may still be useful. These include turbocharger boost pressure and altitude. Some HUD units can warn drivers if the vehicle is in danger of tipping over, which is great for off-roaders.

Even the most rare options can be connected to your smartphone and display turn-by-turn navigation, contact information, or even text messages. The HUDs at the top of this spectrum offer Android Auto and Apple CarPlay support, if your car doesn’t have one.

Although there are many design options, the main thing is that it can display the data you need without taking your eyes from the road. The size of the screen can have a dual-edged effect: large screens can display large numbers and graphic elements, but can also get in the way. The effect on smaller devices is minimal, but it can be more difficult to read.

Different HUDs can offer different screen types, including projecting the data onto a reflective screen or showing it directly. Although the former is more common, projections can grow over distance so that they can project a virtual image as large as 10 inches. Projections can be difficult to see in bright light.

Projector-based HUDs that use projectors display that information on a foldable screen. This provides a better view than beaming it onto your windshield. The screen can be folded down to clear your view of the road ahead.

No matter what kind of HUD you choose to use, color is a huge help. It allows the designer to squeeze more information into a smaller space. Button layout is also important. A single button interface can make it difficult to access layered menu structures or change items.

The final step is to determine where and how the HUD will get its data. Some HUDs use your car’s OBD port. This gives them access to your car’s internal workings, but not as much as an OBD-II scanner. GPS provides information such as drive distance and altitude. GPS-only devices must be plugged into an alternative power source, such as your car’s cigarette lighter.

Do not be afraid to install an HUD. It takes only minutes to set up a modern HUD. The hardest part of installing one is often hiding the cable in the gaps on the dashboard. It’s possible to conceal a small item such as a flat cable rather than a round one. This is something that anyone can do. The units are usually supported by a pad or adhesive strip.

How much should you budget for a quality HUD?

Heads-up displays are available starting at $20, but they are usually second-best. These displays can be monochrome or display only one item such as the car’s speed.

You’ll be rewarded with a display that can show multiple items, even if it costs between $30-$65. Although the most expensive heads-up displays we have reviewed cost $250, they are often well worth it because they can pull data from multiple sources, including OBD, GPS, and your phone.

How to test head-up displays in cars

Two-pronged testing is required to evaluate heads-up displays. Garage work and field testing are two of the options. The first step is to open the box and inspect the contents. Most HUDs include everything you need to set them up. While some HUDs include wire guides, others do not have key elements such as the 12-volt car accessory connector.

The next step is to measure and weigh the main unit. Next, connect it to our test car — a 2014 Audi A4 AllRoad. Once the main unit is placed on the dashboard, it’s checked from the driver’s chair and the position adjusted. Final steps of installation included checking the visibility of the windshield and how difficult it was to thread the cable through the gaps in the dashboard to reach the OBD port.

We measured the time it took for the car to start up, and then measured the time it takes to shut it down after it was turned off. We evaluated the screen by looking at the data for sharpness and design.

The interface and controls are then examined. The screen options on the unit were reviewed and noted. We then go through each option, counting the number and alarms, as well as the alerts.

Once everything is set up, we take each HUD for a test drive. We’re interested in how intuitive the HUD display format is, how the sun reflects on it and how well it handles in the dark.

Special features on many HUDs were tested on the road. The text display function was used on some HUDs, while the inclinometer was on other models. We also tried out the turn-by–turn directions when they were available.

After you have purchased a head-up display for your vehicle, be sure to review other essential automotive items. Even though they are for different reasons, both the best and worst automotive emergency kits will be available in an emergency. The best OBD-II scanners can help diagnose any car problems and determine if you can fix them yourself without having to take your vehicle to a mechanic.

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